70 Fantastic Windows 7 Tips & Tricks For Better Functionality

Windows 7 is much better than the latest version of Windows Vista and it comes with a lot of new features. Unfortunately, some of them aren’t so easy to figure out, so I created a list of the most important tips and tricks and a step-by-step guide that will help you apply all of these great tips and tricks.

1. PC Safeguard

I rarely let anyone use my PC because I’m afraid he will mess it up, but it seems Microsoft has been thinking at me and came with a solution. The PC Safeguard doesn’t let anyone mess your PC settings, because after the user logs off, the configurations are reset back to normal. Of course it will not restore the configurations changed by you, but only the ones done by other users you define.

To use PC Safeguard, go to Control Panel -> User Accounts and create a new account, then select “Set Up Pc Safeguard” and switch it on. Then you can stay relaxed when others use your computer, because you won’t find anything changed, including configurations, downloaded software, installed programs.

2. Screen Calibration

Fortunately, Windows 7 comes with a display calibration wizard that lets you set up the screen brightness properly, so you won’t have any problems viewing photos or text. The problem was that on one PC a photo could look sharp and bright and on another it looks awful. Now the problem can be fixed by pressing the Windows logo key and then typing “DCCW”.

3. AppLocker

If you are usually sharing your computer with someone else, then you might want to restrict their access to your applications, files or documents. Using the Windows 7 AppLocker tool, you have a few options to do this by blocking other users to access Executables, Windows Installers, Scripts, a specific publisher or path.

You can simply do this by pressing the Windows key then typing Gpedit.msc. Then go to Computer Configuration -> Windows Settings -> Security Settings -> Application Control Policies -> AppLocker. Right click on one of the options (Executables, Installers, or Script) and create a new rule. That should save you from a lot of headaches.

4. Burn Images

We all had trouble with image burning in Windows, because it couldn’t do it itself, a standalone software being needed. With Windows 7 this will not be a problem anymore. All you have to do is double-click the ISO image and burn it on the CD or DVD that’s inserted in the drive.

5. Display Empty Removable Drives

Windows 7 will not show empty drives by default, so if you connect an empty drive to your PC, don’t worry, just go to Tools -> Folder Options -> View and uncheck “Hide empty drives in the computer folder”. This doesn’t seem like a good idea and it should not be default setting, because it will be hard for inexperienced users to figure it out. I bet a lot of users will return their newly bought drive thinking it’s broken.

6. Dock The Current Windows To The Left Side Of The Screen

This new feature seems useful because sometimes it’s disturbing that windows seems to float like crazy on the screen and it’s hard to attach them to one side of it. Now this can easily be done using a keyboard shortcut. Press the Windows key + Left key (arrow) to dock it to the left side of the screen.

6.1 Dock The Current Windows To The Right Side Of The Screen

Press the Windows key + Right key to dock it to the right side of the screen.

7. Display Or Hide The Explorer Preview Panel

Press ALT + P to hide it then once again to display it.

8. Display Gadgets On Top Of Other Windows

Press ALT + G

9. Background Photo Slideshow

If you are like me, lazy and bored, then you will want to change the background from time to time, wasting a lot of time. Now you don’t have to do this anymore, because you can set up a slideshow.

Right click on the desktop then go to Personalize -> Desktop Background and hold the CTRL key while choosing the images. Then you can choose the time intervals between images and opt to display them randomly or in a row.

10. Make The Taskbar Smaller

If you feel like the taskbar is using too much of your screen space, you can choose to make the icons smaller. To do this, right-click on the Start button, then go to Properties -> Taskbar and set it to “Use small icons

11. Combine Taskbar Icons

When you have more windows or applications opened, the taskbar’s space might not be enough for them all, so you need to combine them, just like you would in Windows XP or Vista. To do this, right-click the Start button, then go to Properties -> Taskbar and check “Combine when taskbar is full”.

12. Multi-threaded File Copy

If you are a more advanced user, you’ve heard already about Robocopy. Now it’s included in Windows 7 and lets you perform multi-threaded copies from the command line. You can choose the number of threads like this “/MT[:n], which can be from 1 to 128.

13. Maximize Or Restore The Foreground Window

Press Windows Key + Up Key.

14. Minimize The Active Window

Press Windows Key + Down Key

15. Activate The Quick Launch Toolbar

The Quick Launch Toolbar in Windows XP and in Vista seems a very good idea that you might miss when using Windows 7. Fortunately though, you can get it back in a quick few steps.

Right click the taskbar, go to Toolbar -> New Toolbar and type “%UserProfile%AppDataRoamingMicrosoftInternet ExplorerQuick Launch” into the folder box, then click Select Folder.

To make it look like it would in Windows Vista, right click the taskbar, uncheck “Lock the Taskbar”, then right click the divider and uncheck “Show Title” and “Show Text”. Then right click the taskbar and check “Show Small Icons” and you should be done.

16. Preview Photos In Windows Explorer

While in Windows Explorer, Press ALT + P and a preview should appear on the right.

17. Desktop Magnifier

Press the Windows Key and the Plus Key to zoom in or Windows Key and the Minus Key to zoom out. You can zoom anywhere on the desktop and you can even configure your magnifier. You can choose to invert colors, follow the mouse pointer, follow the keyboard focus, or the text insertion point.

18. Minimize Everything Except The Current Window

Press the Windows Key + Home Key.

19. TroubleShoot Power Management

Windows 7 can tell you how much power your system uses or provide detailed information about the power usage and issues caused by each application and device. This way you can optimize the way your battery is used, making It last longer.

Press the Windows Key and type “POWERCFG –ENERGY –OUTPUT <pathfilename>”, and it will create a file called energy-report.html in the folder specified by you, after observing your PC for 60 seconds.

20. Web Searches From Your Desktop

Windows 7 lets you search for online resources, by adding a connector that be downloaded for free.

For instance, go to http://www.istartedsomething.com/flickrsearch/ and download the Flickr connector. After that, you should see the Flickr Search in your searches folder and you will be able to do it directly from your desktop, without needing to visit their website.

21. Add Videos To Your Start Menu

If you were looking for a faster way to access your videos, then Windows 7 has the right answer for you.

Right click the Start button, then go to Properties -> Start Menu -> Customize and set the Videos to “Display as a link” and you’re done, you will now find them in the Start Menu.

22. Shift The Window From One Monitor To Another

If you are using two or more monitors, then you might want to move the Windows from one to another. There is a very simple way to do it.

All you have to do is press the Windows Key + Shift Key + Left or Right Key, depending on what monitor you want to move it to.

23. Custom Power Button

There is an option to replace the “Shut Down” button with another action, if you rarely shut down the computer, but you more often restart it or put it on sleep.

Right click the Start Button, go to Properties and choose the ‘Power Boot Action” to do whatever you want, from the given options.

24. Easily Add A New Font

Adding a new font it’s now easier than ever. Just download the font you want, double click it and you should see the install button.

25. Stretch The Window Vertically

You can stretch the active window vertically to the maximum display height by pressing the Windows + Shift + Up (arrow) keys. Press Windows + Down Keys if you want to restore it.

26. Open Windows Explorer

Press the Windows logo key + E to open a new instance of Windows Explorer.

27. Create A New Instance Of The First Icon In The Taskbar

Press Windows + 1 Keys to open a new instance of the first icon in the taskbar. This could prove really useful in some circumstances.

28. Windows Action Center

Windows Action Center offers you important information about your PC, like the Antivirus Status, updates, troubleshooting and provides a backup scheduling feature.

To access it, go to Control Panel -> System And Security -> Action Center.

29. Windows Troubleshooting Platform

This platform can help you solve a lot of issues you may encounter, like the internet connection, hardware devices, poor system performance and more. You can choose what to troubleshoot and it will come with some possible explanations for the problem that might really help you.

There are a lot of options, guidance and information available there, so give it a try by typing “troubleshoot” or “fix” after pressing the Windows Key.

30. Turn Off System Notifications

System notifications are usually disturbing and aren’t always useful, so you might want to turn some of them off and.

This can be done in Windows 7 by double clicking the Notification Area Icons in Control panel. There you can change notifications and icons for the Action Center, Network, Volume, Windows Explorer, Media Center Tray Applet, Windows Update Automatic Updates.

31. Turn Off Security Messages

To turn off security messages you have to go to Control Panel -> System and Security -> Action Center -> Change Action Center Settings and you can turn off the following notifications: Windows Update, Internet Security Settings, Network Firewall, Spyware and related protection, User Account Control, Virus Protection, Windows Backup, Windows Troubleshooting, Check for updates.

32. Cycle Through The Open Programs Via The Taskbar’s Peek Menu

This works just like Alt + Tab, but opens the menu just above the sidebar, doesn’t seem very useful. Give it a try by pressing The Windows Key + T.

33. Run A Program As An Administrator

You can easily run a program as an administrator by pressing Ctrl + Shift while opening it.

34. Same Program Windows Switching

If you have more instances of a program running, simply hold Ctrl while clicking on its icon and it will cycle through all the instances.

35. Auto Arrange Desktop Icons

You can now forget about the Right Click -> Auto arrange. All you have to do is hold F5 pressed for a bit and the icons will auto arrange.

36. Encrypt Removable USB Drives

Encrypting an USB drive has never been easier. Now you can right click on the removable drive and then on the “Turn on Bitlocker”.

37. Turn Off Smart Window Arrangement

If you don’t like Windows 7’s new features that arrange your windows intelligently, there’s an easy way to turn it off.

Press the Windows Logo Key, type “regedit”, go to HKEY_CURRENT_USERControl PanelDesktop and set WindowArrangementActive to 0. After you reboot your system the smart arrangements will be turned off.

38. Create A System Repair Disc

Windows 7 features a tool that lets you create a bootable System Repair Disc that includes some system tools and the command prompt. To create it, press the Windows Key and type “system repair disc”.

39. Hard-Link Migration Store

The Hard-Link Migration store is only available for new computers and can migrate files, settings, and user accounts. The new Hard-Link Migration Store uses more less disk space and takes less time.

40. Turn Off ‘Send Feedback’

If for some reason, you’re still using the Beta version of Windows 7 and if you feel disturbed by “Send Feedback button”, there is a way to turn it off. Press the Windows Key and type ‘regedit’, then go to HKEY_CURRENT_USERControl PanelDesktop and set FeedbackToolEnabled to 0. After you restart the computer, it shouldn’t be there anymore. Also, if you want to turn it on again, set the FeedbackToolEnabled to 3.

41. Improved Calculator

Windows 7 features an improved calculator that can do unit conversion, date calculation, gas mileage, lease, and mortgage. Also you can choose between Standard, Scientific, Programmer, and Statistic calculator.

42. Open A Folder In A New Process

Windows 7 opens all folders in the same process in order to save resources, but this means if one folder crashes, they all crash. So if you feel like that’s a risk you don’t have to take, then you have to open them all in their own processes.

To do this, hold down Shift button, right-click the drive and “Open in New Process”. Now you will be safe.

43. Problem Step Recorder

The Problem Step Recorder is a great tool that can be used in many circumstances. You can turn it on by pressing the Windows Key, then typing “PSR.exe” and click Record. Now it will record all your moves and save them as a HTML document that you can view or write descriptions to it. This can help you with troubleshooting or when writing a guidance or tutorial.

44. Free Codecs Pack

Unfortunately, Windows Media Player still isn’t able to play many audio and video files, so you will still need some codecs. But with the free codecs pack you can download here you shouldn’t have any problems.

45. Start Windows Explorer From My Computer

Windows Explorer opens in the Libraries directory by default. Most of us are used to see the My Computer page instead.

To change it to My Computer, press the Windows Key, then type “explorer”, select Properties and in the Shortcut tab type “%SystemRoot%explorer.exe /root,::{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}”. Now you have to right-click the Explorer icon in the Taskbar and hit “Unpin this program from the taskbar” and then drag it back from the Start Menu.

46. Clear The Desktop

If there are too many windows on the desktop, you can clear it by shaking a window from left to right and all others will minimize. To restore the other windows you have to shake the active one again.

47. Use Gadgets With UAC Turned Off

Maybe you noticed that once you turn off UAC you can’t use the gadgets anymore, as a security measure. But if you want to risk using them, there a simple way to do it, even with UAC turned off.

Press the Windows Key, type ‘regedit’, go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionSidebarSettings and create a DWORD value named AllowElevatedProcess and set its value to 1. Now you should be able to use your gadgets. If not, then reboot your PC and you should be done.

48. Fix The Media Player & Media Center MP3 Bug

If you have the final version of Windows 7, then go ahead and skip this one, since it applies only to Beta and RC versions.

Both Windows Media Player and Windows Media Center come with a bug that can damage your MP3s by filling missing metadata automatically on imported MP3 files. This can cut a few seconds from the beginning of the tracks and can prove really disturbing. This problem was fixed by Microsoft using the fix that you can download here.

49. Search Everything In Your Computer

Windows 7 offers the possibility to search all file types, including unknown ones and this could help you in some cases.

Though it is not recommended, because it’s much slower than normal search, you can give it a try by doing the following: Launch Windows Explorer, go to Tools -> Folder Options -> View and check “Try to search the content of unknown file types”. If you don’t need it anymore, don’t forget to clear it for an increase in speed.

50. Mouse Gestures

Windows 7 has not only brought gestures for those who use touchscreen devices, but for mouse users too. So, instead of right-clicking a Taskbar icon to access the jump list, you can hold left-click and drag upwards to smoothly call it up. In addition, clicking and dragging down the address bar in Internet Explorer will open the browsing history. There might be more gestures yet not discovered.

51. Configure Your Music Favorites

The Windows Media Center creates a list of favorite songs based on how often you play them, your ratings and date you’ve added them. If you aren’t comfortable with the way they thought it out, change the way it sorts your favorites by going to Tasks -> Settings -> Music -> Favorite Music.

52. Turn Off Recent Search Queries Display

Windows 7 holds and displays the recent search queries by default. This can often prove to be irritating. No need to stress though because it can be disabled.

Press the Windows Key, type “gpedit.msc”, then go to User Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Explorer and double click on “Turn off display of recent search entries”.

53. Advanced Disk Defragmentation

Fortunately, Windows 7 offers much better defragmentation than Vista and also lets you configure it a bit from the command line.

To do it, press the Windows Key and then type “CMD”.

You can defragment your hard disk from the command line by typing “defrag” and you have the following options: “/r” will defrag multiple drives simultaneously, “-a” performs a defrag analysis, “-v” prints the report, “-r” treats files with at least 64 Mb of fragments like are not fragmented, “-w” will defrag everything. An example is “defrag C: -v -w” to defrag the whole drive C.

54. How To Make Internet Explorer 8 Load Faster

If you want Internet Explorer 8 to load faster, you need to disable the add-ons that slow it down, so go to Tools -> Manage Add-ons and check the load time for each one. You can choose for yourself the ones you can live without and ones that would increase the load speed.

55. Media Center Automatic Download

Windows Media Center 12 allows you to schedule data downloads, so it can be done without disturbing you. To do it, go to Tasks -> Settings -> General -> Automatic Download Options and you can configure it to start and stop the download whenever you want.

56. Remove The Sidebar

Windows 7 doesn’t seem to feature the sidebar anymore, but it still exists and runs in the background, being launched automatically at startup. So if you want to get rid of it, there are two ways.

The easier one is to press the Windows Key, (or click Start), in the search box, type MSCONFIG.EXE, click the Startup tab and clear the Sidebar box. The hard way is to press the Windows key, type “regedit”, find and delete the registry key at HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun. This can save you some RAM consumed with no use.

57. Volume Tweaking

Don’t you like that Windows 7 automatically reduces the volume when it detects PC calls? You can turn off this feature by right-clicking the speaker icon in the taskbar, go to Sounds -> Communications and get rid of it.

58. Run A Program As Another User

Windows 7 comes with the possibility to run a program both as an administrator or another user, by right clicking on the executable or shortcut while holding down the Shift key. Then you have to select “Run as another user”.

59. How To Use Virtual Hard Disk Files

You can now create and manage virtual hard disks files in Windows 7 as if they were real disks. This can allow you to use a live Windows installation on the virtual disk without the need to boot the virtual Computer. To create a virtual disk you have to press the Windows Key, right-click on Computer, then go to Manage -> Disk Management -> Action -> Create VHD. There you can specify the location and size of your virtual hard disk file.

To attach the virtual disk file, press the Windows Key, right-click Computer, then go to Manage -> Disk Management -> Action -> Attach VHD and you have to specify the location and if it’s read only or not.

To initialize a virtual hard disk, press the Windows Key, right-click on Computer, go to Manage -> Disk Management -> Action -> Attach VHD, specify the location, click Ok, then right click on the virtual disk and click on Initialize Disk. Select the partition style you want to use and then right-click on the unallocated space and click “New Simple Volume” and follow the instructions wizard. Now, a new hard drive appears in Windows Explorer and you can use it as a real partition.

60. Remove The Windows Live Messenger Tab In The Taskbar

To get rid of the Windows Live Messenger Tab and put it back in the system tray, where it belongs, go to C:Program FilesWindows LiveMessenger, right-click msnmsdgr.exe and set its compatibility mode to Windows Vista.

61. Lock The Screen

There is no Lock Screen button in the Start Menu anymore, so you have to press the Windows Key + L to lock it, now. It seems easier, in case you don’t forget the shortkey.

62. Create A Screen Lock Shortcut

In case you don’t like shortkeys or you keep forgetting them, there’s another option for screen lock.

Simply create a new shortcut to C:WindowsSystem32rundll32.exe user32.dll, LockWorkStation and place it wherever you want.

63. Enable Run Command In Start Menu

If you miss the old Run Command button in XP, then there’s an option to get it back in Windows 7.

Right-click an open area in Start Menu, go to Properties -> Start Menu -> Customize and check “Run Command”. Now you should be done.

64. Improve Desktop Window Manager For Nvidia Graphics

Sometimes the animations for Desktop Window Manager don’t look very well and aren’t smooth enough and this is cause because Desktop Window Manager renders effects with no transparency and blurring, but you can turn off animations for more pleasant graphics.

Press the Windows Key, right-click on Computer, go to Properties -> Advanced System Settings -> Performance -> Settings and clear “Animate windows when minimizing and maximizing”. Click OK to finnish.

65. Change Default Save Location For Files

Windows 7 is a bit different from Vista, because it saves Documents, Pictures, Videos and Music under the Public folder inside C:Users. You might not want to save your documents, pictures, videos or music to this location, but create your own locations and you can do it quite easy.

Press the Windows Key, click your username and double-click on the folder you wish to change. Then you will see Includes: 2 library locations. Click on that text, right-click on the folder you wish to set like default and click “Set as default file location”, then click Ok.

66. Make 64bit Windows Media Player Default (only for X64 users)

Windows comes with the 32bit version of Media Player by default. If you are a x64 user, you can keep the system cleaner by only installing one set of codecs.

To do this, press the Windows Key, type “command”, right-click on Command Prompt and hit “Run as administrator”, then type “unregmp2.exe /SwapTo:64?”. After that, press the Windows Key, type “regedit”, go to HKLMSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionApp Pathswmplayer.exe, double click on value and change “%ProgramFiles(x86)” to “%ProgramFiles%”. Now you should be using the 64bit Windows Media Player.

67. Open Multiple Instances Of Windows Explorer Via The Taskbar

If you want to run more instances of the Windows Explorer just by hitting the startbar, you can do it by following these steps:

Unpin Windows Explorer from the Taskbar, then press the Windows Key, go to Accessories, right-click Windows Explorer, go to Properties and change the shortcut path to %SystemRoot%explorer.exe /root,::{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D} ( if you want it to default to My Computer ) or %SystemRoot%explorer.exe /root,::{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5} ( if you want it to default to Libraries ). Now repin Windows Explorer to your Taskbar and you’re done.

All that is required for opening more instances of it is just a click of the middle mouse button. If you aren’t pleased with what you’ve done, change the shortcut path back to %SystemRoot%explorer.exe.

68. Make The System Tray Clock Show The AM / PM Symbols

By default Windows 7 does show the time in 24 hour format, so if you want to get the AM / PM symbols, press the Windows Key, type “intl.cpl” to open Regional and Language Options, go to Additional Settings -> Time where Long Time is set to HH:mm and change it to HH:mm tt, for example, where tt is the AM or PM symbol ( 21:12 PM ). To change it to the 12 hour format, you need to type it like this hh::mm tt ( 9:12 PM ).

69. Internet Explorer 8 Compatibility Mode

If your websites don’t render correctly, you might need to enable Internet Explorer 8 display them in compatibility view. This issue is because of the updated rendering engine, which causes a lot of trouble. To do it, open Internet Explorer, go to Tools -> Compatibility View Settings and check “Display all websites in compatibility view”, then click Ok.

That’s it! There you go – 70 very useful tips and tricks for Microsoft Windows 7. Maybe you knew some of these but I’m sure there are some that you did not heard of. They can prove very useful and can save you a lot of time while using Windows 7.

I’m sure you’re asking yourself where’s the tip number 70? Ok, the tip or advice that will help you work faster and more efficiently, with less frustration is…

70. Just Don’t Use Windows Vista

Yes, this is very useful tip and it is strongly recommended. In fact, I should have put this one on the top of the list, so you better apply it… for your own good.

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[tags]windows 7, tips and tricks, features, top list, useful tips, guide, how to, vista, microsoft, internet explorer, windows media center[/tags]

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58 Responses
  • Harsh Agrawal Reply

    Great list..
    thanks for sharing…..stumbled…:)

    • GenniCe Reply

      Thanks Agrawal. I’m glad you like it, enjoy!

    • FAROOK P.A Reply

      its fentastic…..thanks for sharing………..

  • Michael Reply

    Even as someone who’s only briefly toyed with the windows 7 beta.. this is still pretty interesting, its nice to see microsoft actually thinking of ways to speed up, and assuming its a much lighter, more responsive and less bug prone operating system, It will hopefully make our lives a bit easier (then again, i’m probably one of the few “Vista Fans” out there :)

    A few of these are applicable to Xp/Vista (Winkey+L for screen lock etc..) but i’m pretty excited about mouse jestures (if you’ve used opera, or Firefox with mouse jesture plugin… you’ll know why! if you havent get your hands on it now!)

    Good post, thumbs up on stumbleupon!!

  • Anonymous Reply

    In other words: Windows 7 does nothing spectacular I couldn’t already do in Linux better.

  • GenniCe Reply

    @Michael,
    I’m glad that you like this post and thanks for the thumbs up! :) I agree with you, Microsoft really put a lot of effort to make this version of Windows better than Vista was. And to return the reputation that Win XP made for Microsoft.

    @Anonymous,
    To be honest, I was one of the Microsoft haters and I really used Linux much more than Windows. All that because I realized that Vista was junk after XP and that really disappointed me. But now REALLY Windows 7 IS different and is much better than both XP and Vista. And this is only Beta version, so you can imagine how much better it will be when it goes final. I will write a post that lists more features that Microsoft added to Windows ‘Release Candidate’ so you can see what I’m talking about.
    But, after all there will always be people who simply love Linux more than Windows… It’s all matter of taste and the way you want to use it…

    Thanks for visiting guys! Enjoy!

  • SeanFalloy Reply

    Alot of this has been implemented in linux system for years. In fact it seems that windows is becoming more *nix like with every release. The only problem is they still use the damn registry

  • pyroguysf Reply

    I use both Linux (various distros) and Windows XP. I refuse to upgrade to Vista because of, mostly obvious reasons (i.e. it really kinda sucks), and I strongly advise anyone who asks me about Vista to avoid it as best they can. I used Vista when it was in beta and sure it looked cool, but that was about it. While I prefer Linux, there’s software that WINE just can’t pull off. Windows 7 is a big jump for MS. In simple terms, it looks even better than Vista, but without all the resource hogging. From my bit of testing it performs even better than XP. While Linux has had mayn features for a while, it seems like MS is learning. While they’ve got the popular OS, it’s also the oddball, seeing as most everything is, at least somewhat, UNIX based. The Windows 7 I used was extremely polished for a beta, and it’s going to be interesting to see where MS is going next.

  • Anonymous Reply

    “Alot of this has been implemented in linux system for years. In fact it seems that windows is becoming more *nix like with every release. The only problem is they still use the damn registry”

    And drive letter access, and a completely non-FHS-compliant file system, AND still strongly dependant on proprietary software. And it’s STILL not a true multi-user system.

    Ironic, really. Microsoft set out to create NT (Which 7 descends from.) to be a UNIX-killer, but it failed because, and pay VERY close attention to what I say here, NT did nothing UNIX could do. Hard to rival a power distribution family when your own is so lacking in powerful features. The NT kernel STILL isn’t up to par with UNIX or Linux.

    Windows may be a small step towards actually rivaling UNIX with 7, but it’s an extremely small baby step. From what I’ve seen, Microsoft is around 5-10 years behind the other operating systems (UNIX and Linux in particular.) in real technology. Oh, sure, they have USB, hardware acceleration, etc. You know, all the mainstream technology BS a three-year-old operating system could implement with little trouble. But there’s so many things Windows keeps playing catch-up on: It was the LAST of the three major operating systems to get true window compositing (A la Aqua or Compiz Fusion.), LAST to get intra-filesystem mounting, albeit poorly supported IFM, and still has yet to do things like a unified filesystem structure, compliant with the (Powerful and efficient.) Filesystem Hierarchy Standard.

    Then there’s PowerShell. It took Microsoft that long to get a decent command line for Windows and it’s still barely implemented. A lot of anti-*nix types seem to think implementing a powerful command line is backward, but there are soooooooooooooooooo many things I can do in a cLI that are impossible in a GUI since it’s impossible to actually be fully explicit with a GUI. You click a button, trusting that the backend does something dynamic. With a CLI, you get a lot of tools, and I mean a LOT of tools you don’t get in a GUI: Like piping, stdin, stdout, stderr, etc. DOS has extremely limited piping capability. PowerShell was Microsoft’s attempt at making a UNIX-style CLI. The problem is they tied it in with .NET. Bad move. BAD move. No decent CLI should have ANY high-level dependencies.

    This is not to say UNIX and Linux don’t have GUIs. Far from it. *nix implements the extremely powerful, if somewhat hard-to-develop-for X Windowing System, another thing Microsoft has yet to catch up to, which by itself is just the low-level architecture the window managers and desktop environments use. X is capable of basically tranferring the entire GUI to a remote computer WITHOUT something limited and insecure like RDP or VNC. And don’t get me started on X forwarding.

    There are sooooo many things Microsoft has yet to implement.

  • Tony Cheetham Reply

    @Anonymous

    Like a lot of *nix users, you completely miss the point as always. When comparing windows XP/7 with *nix, you are comparing an SUV to a Formula One racing car. Now you listen to this carefully, windows xp/vista/7 are not, and will never be aimed at replacing unix, nor has Microsoft ever claimed this is the case. What they do compete with is the standard users experience of GUI based *nix distributions such as Ubuntu, and on that level they come out on top.

    Seriously, you think Ma Barker sat at home checking her email gives a toss about stdin, or grep? If Ma Barker is really concerned about Windows being to complicated, she will go and use a Mac. Would you care to have a dig at macOS? Sure it’s unix based, but it’s universally accepted by anyone whose tried to go beyond regular usage that it is a terrible OS.

    You’re primary fault comes in looking at Desktop OS’s as server OS’s, Microsoft has always had a clear divide there. 2008 server has a command line only install, it has dumb terminals(Yes, just like X), it has built-in virtualisation, and plenty of other stuff you are probably not aware of.

  • Anonymous Reply

    “Like a lot of *nix users, you completely miss the point as always. When comparing windows XP/7 with *nix, you are comparing an SUV to a Formula One racing car. Now you listen to this carefully, windows xp/vista/7 are not, and will never be aimed at replacing unix, nor has Microsoft ever claimed this is the case. What they do compete with is the standard users experience of GUI based *nix distributions such as Ubuntu, and on that level they come out on top.”

    Read the book “Showstopper,” which was all about NT’s development. NT was originally aimed at being a portable OS (Which it isn’t.) and a UNIX killer (Which it isn’t.) It wasn’t until windows XP came to be that NT was ever intended to be a home desktop system, with XP being the only one so far being even moderately succesful.

    “Seriously, you think Ma Barker sat at home checking her email gives a toss about stdin, or grep? If Ma Barker is really concerned about Windows being to complicated, she will go and use a Mac. Would you care to have a dig at macOS? Sure it’s unix based, but it’s universally accepted by anyone whose tried to go beyond regular usage that it is a terrible OS.”

    I’ll agree that Mac OS X is a terrible OS, even for home users, since it doesn’t really allow for the full spectrum of users out there, which I think is very important.

    Also, if you ask me, making Mac OS X a UNIX was an absolute waste of time, money, and man-hours.
    “You’re primary fault comes in looking at Desktop OS’s as server OS’s, Microsoft has always had a clear divide there. 2008 server has a command line only install, it has dumb terminals(Yes, just like X), it has built-in virtualisation, and plenty of other stuff you are probably not aware of.”

    Actually, I’m fully aware of what Server 2008 has. But it still pales in comparison to *nix as a server OS. The Internet has scant few Windows servers because administrators still see Windows as a limited proprietary system they can’t customize to the level of *nix, which like it or not, is very important for an efficient, stable, secure server.

    Also, it’s not “dumb terminals,” it is “terminal emulators.” Dumb terminals are the actual physical hardware terminals used to connect to mainframes. Terminal emulators are the programs that allow you to “connect” to your system’s text shells, either through PTS devices, which are a favorite of X terminals, or TTY devices, which are a favorite for pure-text terminals. Of course, X itself will usually run on TTY7 through TTY12 while TTY1 through TTY6 are reserved for command lines. This will vary. The average *nix user will only really user TTY7 for X. And if the user has screen installed and knows how to use it: Only TTY1 splitting off into countless PTS devices for each program.

    Next, if you think Mac OS X and Windows are how even home operating systems are supposed to be, you are incorrect, sir. Windows in particular is not really designed with any of the key design philosophies of operating systems in mind. It was designed to sell, it was designed in a very swift manner for each release with the purpose of keeping a monopoly in power. It integrates way too much things into places where they shouldn’t be integrated. There’s the “required” GUI, etc. But if you were to ask any GOOD computer scientist worth his salt if Windows is in any way a half-decent operating system. After correcting you on what an operating system actually is, he’ll tell you just what crap Windows is and how desktop systems would be about 20 years more advanced than they are now if not for Microsoft’s domination of those systems with a horribly limited and flawed operating system. Yes, even Macs, which I always found to be overpriced, while still having hardware PC users may have thought was cutting edge five years ago.

  • Tony Cheetham Reply

    “Read the book “Showstopper,” which was all about NT’s development. NT was originally aimed at being a portable OS (Which it isn’t.) and a UNIX killer (Which it isn’t.) It wasn’t until windows XP came to be that NT was ever intended to be a home desktop system, with XP being the only one so far being even moderately succesful.”

    I said XP/vista/7.

    “Actually, I’m fully aware of what Server 2008 has. But it still pales in comparison to *nix as a server OS. The Internet has scant few Windows servers because administrators still see Windows as a limited proprietary system they can’t customize to the level of *nix, which like it or not, is very important for an efficient, stable, secure server.”

    I don’t know if your confusing the word “scant” with another, but there is a fair percentage of windows servers out there, and it’s taking chunks out of apache all the time(http://news.netcraft.com/archives/2009/03/overallc.png). This is mostly due to .net, but still, it’s a sign that MSServer is not the joke it used to be back in the NT4 days

    And I take a very strong opposition to your assertation that windows is not secure, or stable(Efficient is a more grey area). I personally manage a ton of windows servers, and without them falling over, getting hacked or needing rebooting every week. And yes there on the internet, and yes they run several public services, including web. Windows is as stable and secure as any other OS out there *IF* it isn’t run by morons. I have seen many many unix servers being hacked, and falling over through errors, and it can always be put down to admin-error. This isn’t, Windows is better, this is, Windows is not as bad as the propoganda will tell you.

    “Also, it’s not “dumb terminals,” it is “terminal emulators.”

    I’ll skip the rest of this, it was a complicated typo, you knew full well what I meant.

    “Next, if you think Mac OS X and Windows are how even home operating systems are supposed to be, you are incorrect, sir.”

    And why hasn’t somebody done this for *nix? I actually know why, it’s because the world of computer science as it is taught, and the application of it in the real world are two completely different things. You argue the symantics of the use of the term “Operating System”, but you know what we are talking about, the package as a whole, the core OS, the GUI, the built-in apps. And for this nobody has come close. People can claim all day long that Microsoft has a monopoly, yet apple and ubuntu have come along and grabbed a market share because people really dont need anything that comes with windows. They mostly want email and porn, and that’s available anywhere, so all this crap about MS making a monopoly and that’s locked everyone out is rubbish. The people are there, they dont want windows specific apps, they want a nice OS.

    I rememeber using ubuntu about 2 years ago, and having to go and manually edit a config file and then reboot my system just to get my screen res above 1024X768!! Maybe that’s why windows isn’t such a great “OS”, maybe they put all that time and effort into the display panel?

  • Anonymous Reply

    “I said XP/vista/7.”

    Which is NT. New names does not mean a new system. It doesn’t change the fact it was still developed in an attempt to destroy UNIX.

    “I don’t know if your confusing the word “scant” with another, but there is a fair percentage of windows servers out there, and it’s taking chunks out of apache all the time(http://news.netcraft.com/archives/2009/03/overallc.png). This is mostly due to .net, but still, it’s a sign that MSServer is not the joke it used to be back in the NT4 days”

    Please, for the love of God, consider the source. Netcraft has been completely wrong on so many things through its time. Also note that statistics are horribly unreliable at best and anyone who relies on them as proof is a fool. Note also that since Linux doesn’t undergo product registration like Windows, there’s probably a whole load of servers that aren’t even being recorded by Netcraft. Also note that most Windows servers are not Internet-facing. They’re almost always just deployed in home networks and small businesses. Most large businesses deploy *nix servers both in Internet uses as well as file servers, etc. ALSO considering the SAMPLING here in that statistic: Purely web servers. Of which Apache and IIS are the biggest contenders, with Apache leading by far. Web servers, not the full desployment. If you were to look at a more complete sampling of JUST server stacks, not just web servers, you’d find Windows deployments are not going to be part of the top three. Not even close.

    “And I take a very strong opposition to your assertation that windows is not secure, or stable(Efficient is a more grey area). I personally manage a ton of windows servers, and without them falling over, getting hacked or needing rebooting every week. And yes there on the internet, and yes they run several public services, including web. Windows is as stable and secure as any other OS out there *IF* it isn’t run by morons. I have seen many many unix servers being hacked, and falling over through errors, and it can always be put down to admin-error. This isn’t, Windows is better, this is, Windows is not as bad as the propoganda will tell you.”

    Actually, it is. As an experienced software developer, I can tell you, it absolutely is. And frankly, I believe anyone who says that their Windows installation never has viruses is a bloody liar. Let me guess, you use Norton? You use commercial firewalls and antivirus? Those have been proven, time and time again, that they’re unreliable. Yes, it’s a lot more secure for someone who nows what they are doing. But every time I compare *nix security to Windows security, I just laugh at Windows.

    Windows servers have yet to even have the sort up uptime of *nix servers. Especially seeing how you can rarely get any updates for Windows without having to restart it, whereas with Linux system restarts are limited to being kernel updates, and there is software out there for Linux that allows you to load a new kernel without having to compromise uptime at all.

    “I’ll skip the rest of this, it was a complicated typo, you knew full well what I meant.”

    Yes, I did, but it seem to indicate to me you’re no more a network administrator than I am if you can’t keep them straight.

    “And why hasn’t somebody done this for *nix? I actually know why, it’s because the world of computer science as it is taught, and the application of it in the real world are two completely different things. You argue the symantics of the use of the term “Operating System”, but you know what we are talking about, the package as a whole, the core OS, the GUI, the built-in apps. And for this nobody has come close. People can claim all day long that Microsoft has a monopoly, yet apple and ubuntu have come along and grabbed a market share because people really dont need anything that comes with windows. They mostly want email and porn, and that’s available anywhere, so all this crap about MS making a monopoly and that’s locked everyone out is rubbish. The people are there, they dont want windows specific apps, they want a nice OS.”

    They have. UNIX is famous for actually BEING the yardstick by which most academia bases operating system design off of. UNIX has the “small efficient tools” thing down pat. Modularity is there, I can interchange just about any part I want in Linux, unlike Windows (Thos style of modularity was promised by Microsoft for Windows 7 but, naturally, they didn’t deliver since that requires actually talented engineers.)

    “I rememeber using ubuntu about 2 years ago, and having to go and manually edit a config file and then reboot my system just to get my screen res above 1024X768!! Maybe that’s why windows isn’t such a great “OS”, maybe they put all that time and effort into the display panel?”

    You must use an ATI card. That is not Linux’s fault, but AMD/ATI’s. I used Ubuntu before switching to Arch. Never once had to mess with my X configuration just like the majority of Ubuntu users.

    In fact, in my experience I’ve gotten more display capability out of Linux than Windows. Windows’ dual-head capability seems hacked on, whereas X’s capability for it has been pretty darn well implemented.

    As for my personal experience: I got resolutions out of my monitor video card that the Explorer shell just refused to do.

    Now, I confess, in Arch, I did have problems getting my favorite 1400×1050 resolution. But by simply copying my xorg.conf from an Ubuntu LiveUSB where I had it set up properly JUST by installing the nvidia driver, I got all I wanted.

    As for your claims Microsoft has no monopoly:

    First off, Ubuntu, like the rest of Linux, has less than 1% of the desktop market. Not a threat to Windows. Mac OS X doesn’t even run on “conventional” PCs. Okay, I’m being generous to Macs here since hardware-wise they ARE conventional PCs now. But Mac OS X doesn’t have more than 10% of the desktop market. I’d be surprised if it had more than 5%.

    You’re also seeming to forget that Microsoft was TWICE convicted of being a monopoly: First by the DoJ, though a settlement basically made that conviction powerless, and second by the EU, which did stick and managed to fine Microsoft some money which, sadly, is pocket change to Microsoft.

    They have a monopoly on the desktop. They don’t need 100% control for it to be a monopoly, it just needs to be recognized as one under the law, which it was… TWICE.

  • Tony Cheetham Reply

    “Please, for the love of God, consider the source. Netcraft has been completely wrong on so many things through its time. Also note that statistics are horribly unreliable at best and anyone”

    Well you were the first to proclaim that windows was a small fry in the server market, so unless you have some better source than netcraft, I’m going to stick with believing that. The old “Well I see more linux then windows” isn’t enough of a credible source. If you want a good yardstick we can believe in, check the job markets and see which has more jobs available, PHP or C#. I know here in the UK and a lot of europe it’s C# by quite a distance.

    “Actually, it is. As an experienced software developer, I can tell you, it absolutely is. And frankly, I believe anyone who says that their Windows installation never has viruses is a bloody liar. Let me guess, you use Norton? You use commercial firewalls and antivirus?”

    I am also an experienced software developer(I run the servers for our place through necessity), and my windows installations, both here and at work have NEVER had a virus, ever. In fact only one of the 50′ish pcs on my network have ever had a virus and it was through user error, running a crack for some software he shouldn’t have been doing. I made sure everyone understood how frigging stupid that was, and that I would maim anyone else who did it.(Personally if I was to run a crack, it would be in locked VM)

    We do not run norton(I’m frankly slightly insulted you would suggest that), and we use no firewall/security software/hardwae beyond what is built into windows server(Windows firewall itself is disabled). I know you will think I’m mad for purely using policy management, but all our servers easily pass PCI/DSS requirements so that usually shuts people up. Again, windows has hidden talents in the hands of people who know how to use it.

    The last virus I had was the chernobyl virus, and I was too green to know better. It really isn’t that hard to do. In fact, people still look at me with shock when I say the XP installation on my home PC has been on it for 5 years, since I bought the original box. Again, really not hard to do with a bit of experience.

    “Windows servers have yet to even have the sort up uptime of *nix servers. Especially seeing how you can rarely get any updates for Windows without having to restart it,”…

    You really are harking back to 2000 and early 2003 there. There are 2 important errors most windows server admins make here. The first is to allow automatic updates, mine are all disabled and updated centrally with essential non-reboot patches on a daily basis(If needed). Second, any patch requiring a reboot is queued unless it is a security related patch that effects service open to the outside world. The queues can sit there for months at a time if need be.

    “whereas with Linux system restarts are limited to being kernel updates, and there is software out there for Linux that allows you to load a new kernel without having to compromise uptime at all.”

    Ye, alright unix wins on that one, but let’s not forget this golden egg of uptime that is so important, really isn’t the most important thing. Any service that relies on a single box is likely to be local(A global service on a single server is just stupid and probably over-worked), and therefore expendable at off-peak hours. Anything global will be on a cluster or have fall-over(If uptime is so important, a back-up server is essential), and can safely be rebooted at any time.

    “They have. UNIX is famous for actually BEING the yardstick by which most academia bases operating system design off of. ”

    Again, academia real world, as a software engineer who no doubt has deadlines and a pointy haired boss you should know this better than most people in IT.

    “You must use an ATI card. That is not Linux’s fault, but AMD/ATI’s. I used Ubuntu before switching to Arch. Never once had to mess with my X configuration just like the majority of Ubuntu users.”

    No it was a 7800GS and an AMD chip, and it worked fine in windows. But even if it was the fault of amd/ati, on windows it would have been patched up and sorted, so normal users wouldn’t have been faced with the daunting task of changing text config files manually.

    “As for your claims Microsoft has no monopoly:”

    Well, I didn’t say that, I actually said

    “People can claim all day long that Microsoft has a monopoly, yet apple and ubuntu have come along and grabbed a market share because people really dont need anything that comes with windows.”

    My point being that people are proving right now that they do not need windows. And the market is there, and it is open for other operating systems to jump in and steal disgruntled windows users. But they don’t in any huge numbers. There isn’t the market for it, because a large proportion of windows users are more than happy.

    I am *not* arguing that windows was not involved in some very shady things, and that there monopoly was in part manufactured. I think if Microsoft hasn’t pulled that dirty tricks compaign, it would still be in a dominant position and perhaps not quite as hated as it is.

  • Keith Johnson Reply

    I haven’t had a chance to see Windows 7 yet, but I now have this great article/post bookmarked, and will be using this information to navigate and learn Windows 7, to see just what it can do. Many thanks for such an insightful and well thought-out post, will definitely help many users as they venture into Windows 7 :)

  • GenniCe Reply

    I’m glad you found this post helpful Keith. It really took a lot of effort to make this list and I’m glad to see others use it as a reference.

    Enjoy!

  • Korr Reply

    Some of this are already implemented since Win9x.
    Like pressing ‘windows’ + ‘E’ is somewhat ancient.

  • tukancheez Reply

    Very nice article, been a user of W7 since the first beta versions and the process is evident in polishing the “seven” into a better OS. On the other hand I quickly get used to linux distribution, it seems to me much better in option to set all I want.
    Anyway this article shows me interesting stuff so when I switch to W7, surely will test some of them. Thanks for your time and effort in writing this!
    BTW: Simply luv the WordPress theme of your website, so simple, clean and mainly readable. Keep on writing interesting articles! Regards DJ Tukancheez

  • GenniCe Reply

    Tukancheez, thanks and I’m glad you like the theme! :) I really wanted to be simple, easy readable and somewhat eye-candy! :) I’m very glad someone noticed that…

    Btw, your blog theme is great too!

    Enjoy!

  • Dwindle Reply

    Does there always need the disgruntled Linux user? We tried Linux, it was an abject failure, we moved on to superior Microsoft systems. Get a kitten or something.
    ___

    I’ve been using Win7 for almost a year now, and I’m impressed. MS is still a crap company, but it seems they are aquiring common sense if not ethic. Let the users sort the bug for them, and they may prosper (the only strenth of Linux).
    ___

    RE: #65: This makes no sense. I have no username in the startmenu. I have a user icon, but clicking it brings me to nothing of this sort. I wish Windows would finally accept the fact that I use two partitions. I don’t want all of my personal files buried deep in a nested folder where they will be erased in a system crash. I keep them on a seperate partition so when the OS acts funny or is damaged, I can repair it with a disk image (which Win7 is surprisingly capable of doing) without altering my files.
    ___

    Tip #71: It irks me that Explorer doesn’t have a folder up icon, which I consider imperative as I don’t use a folder tree. ALT+up arrow works in it’s place, though I still don’t see why I can’t have it.

  • Anonymous Reply

    “Does there always need the disgruntled Linux user? We tried Linux, it was an abject failure, we moved on to superior Microsoft systems. Get a kitten or something.”

    That made me laugh. You honestly think Windows is a quality product? Windows doesn’t even follow any set standards, for one (No, being a monopolistic de facto “standard” doesn’t count. If it ain’t POSIX, it ain’t standards-compliant. Period. Try porting code from any other standards-compliant OS like OS X, BSD, or Linux to Windows, and you’ll see what a gagglefuck Windows actually is. Whereas I could effortlessly port between the three without changing a SINGLE LINE OF MY CODE.) And Windows 7 is nothing but an attempt by Microsoft to cover up their WinVista fuckups. And so many features I’ve seen in the release candidate (NOT the Beta, the RC, for you idiot Windows users, that means it is basically in final form, barring any unlikely showstopper bugs where it would need to be changed.) are just Microsoft trying to cop out Linux or OS X some more. The taskbar and configuration system? Can you say KDE?

    Linux is not low-quality if your so-called “techs” can’t figure it out. All that means is your “techs” are the incompetent kind who think they know computers simply because they got an MCE certificate. Note how Microsoft certified techs get paid a lot less than those who are certified as Linux techs. Why? Because Linux, unlike Windows, is a powerful tool that takes real skill beyond the mindless point-and-click your non-techs were trained for. It runs a technical infrastructure far better than Windows ever will. You do realize that over two thirds of the Internet is run on Linux, NOT Windows, right? And that far more Windows Internet-facing servers are breached or infected?

    So, I find it laughable whenever someone actually convinced themselves that Windows is actually high quality, because between being completely non-standards compliant and insecure, it’s also a textbook example of poor design and quality in a system that one would want to trust for mission-critical ends.

  • Dwindle Reply

    No, Windows is not a “quality” product. It is just a far better quality than Linux. Linux has no actual usefulness other than “geekiness” creds. Big deal, it can run a server. Can it run a desktop? No. It fails miserably, and you Linux users actually expect every user on Earth to spend hours a day with man pages and forums posting config files and error messages trying to figure out why they can’t play movies, control a printer, or use a damned wireless mouse you have another thing coming. KDE is imitatiojn Windows XP, it doesn’t have the functionality of Seven, which you don’t even know about. Linux was a cute dream, one that made sense in Windows 3.1 days, but a failed actuality. Windows Seven is better than every Linux distro ever built combined, and continues to blow minds. Linux is old hat and forgotten. No one cares about your playground “standards” and “copyleft” nonsense. We want machines that are fast, fun, and easy to use, and Windows delivers it better than anyone else

    • llamudos Reply

      I have to agree with dwindle

      I have worked with Windows operating systems for 13 years and i can safely say that its a pile of cack. I have never used anything else TBH but feel Microsoft has never fixed serious issues like memory seepage or listened to its customer base. My attitude is don’t fix/break something that isn’t broken, XP was MS’s best effort. All Microsoft seem interested in is reinventing the same old package at the customers expense with a couple of extra gimics. Lets change classic view that 90% of the population of the world use without issue to some unfriendly view that makes harder work. How many staff all over the world groan at the idea that MS will yet again bring out another OS that has no relevance to the everyday user or business!!!!!

    • Anonymous Reply

      Far better quality than Linux? Is that why Windows is used on most servers, cell phones, supercomputers, embedded systems, robotics, the military, stock market, corporate infrastructures?

      Is that why Windows has only 30 in-the-wild viruses, few exploits beyond quickly-fixed 0-day exploits, and a nearly-impenetrable access control system available for its open source kernel?

      Oh wait, that’s Linux, not Windows. Anyone who says Windows is higher quality than Linux doesn’t know what the f*ck they’re talking about. Sorry Dwindle, have you even USED Linux before, or are you just talking out of your a*ss?

      Linux is not just “geek cred.” Outside the desktop, Linux is KILLING Windows, and absolutely dominating just about anything else.

      And on the desktop, while Linux hasn’t taken the market, I can SAFELY say Linux is way ahead of Windows on the desktop, usability and quality-wise. More flexible, better usability features, can fit any user like a glove. Also, there’s NOTHING in Windows 7 Ultimate you can’t get in even Ubuntu for free, and more, and Ubuntu is probably the least well-maintained Linux distribution out there.

      Linux is also far speedier and nowhere NEAR as bloated as Windows is. True story: I did a comparison of Windows 7 without any extras and Arch Linux with ALL my software installed. Windows 7 “barebones” was still a whopping 12 GiB, whereas Arch with loads of extra software didn’t even clear 3 GiB.

      And Linux is an OS with software that beats out Windows in features and quality for most software, and they STILL manage to keep things slim.

      Let’s not even bother arguing the fact Linux supports way more hardware out-of-the-box than Windows (Try installing a RETAIL copy of Windows. The reason Windows works “out-of-the-box” on PCs is because OEMs do the legwork of putting drivers in for you. If you install Windows yourself you can expect next to nothing actually WORKING properly, if at all.), has a significantly larger driver base, can run on more than three CPU architectures.

      The only thing Linux doesn’t have going for it is gaming, and its not for a lack of technology. With OpenGL/OpenAL/OpenCL support up the wazoo (All three of which have been proven time and time again to actually be far more technically sound and more powerful than anything DirectX has to offer yet.) and no less than THREE different gaming APIs (Allegro, SDL, and SFML.), all of which outperform and outpower DirectX, Linux could be a veritable monster on a gaming machine if game developers would stop buying into the DirectX marketing. Just ask John Carmack how well his dedication to OpenGL has been working out for him.

      Lets also point out the fact that open source has been shown to drastically improve the security, stability, and quality of its software. Linux is open source. Windows is not.

      Linux is less quality than Windows, my a*ss.

  • Anonymous Reply

    “No, Windows is not a “quality” product. It is just a far better quality than Linux.”

    Windows is less quality than Linux. Windows isn’t even POSIX compliant.

    “Linux has no actual usefulness other than “geekiness” creds. Big deal, it can run a server. Can it run a desktop? No.”

    Lets see… Linux penetrates most other markets even more than Windows. Server? Linux. Embedded? Linux. Supercomputers? Linux. Movies? Linux. Just because its dominant on the desktop doesn’t mean its quality or used heavily in other markets. I’ve seen plenty of people with no technical experience run Linux a lot better than Windows. If you failed at running Linux. That’s your own fault.

    “It fails miserably, and you Linux users actually expect every user on Earth to spend hours a day with man pages and forums posting config files and error messages trying to figure out why they can’t play movies, control a printer, or use a damned wireless mouse you have another thing coming.”

    Getting movie playback is as simple as just installing the package. It’s one of the easiest damn things in Linux. Unless you’re using a Lexmark, printers work out of the box in Linux, without even a driver disk. I use wirless mice all the time on all sorts of Linux installs. Never had to do anything. IF you have troubles, you’re problem, not Linux’s, since the layman can easily set up Linux these days.

    “KDE is imitatiojn Windows XP, it doesn’t have the functionality of Seven, which you don’t even know about.”

    Except the fact I do, having actually used both. I have the Win7 RC installed right now. And I’ll conced it is MUCH better than Vista. But, as is typical of Windows, it’s still years behind everyone else. It’s got drive letters still, it makes its mission in life to wait for the competition to invent and perfect a technology before taking. And if KDE is supposed to be an imitation of XP, how come its nothing like Windows XP? Ooooooh, too bad. Win7 still copied KDE. Do a side-by-side screenshot comparison. Ouch. KDE 3.5 has been around a lot longer than 7.

    “Linux was a cute dream, one that made sense in Windows 3.1 days, but a failed actuality.”

    Yes, it failed so bad its adoption rate is growing exponentially every year and Windows is losing market share. Are you aware they dropped below 89% late last year and never made it back BECAUSE of Linux?

    “Windows Seven is better than every Linux distro ever built combined, and continues to blow minds.”

    The only minds I’ve seen blown are the people who use Windows and don’t know how to use the alternatives. Talk to a non-Windows user, suddenly your consensus that Windows is “blowing minds” is broken. And as I stated before, Windows 7 does nothing I couldn’t already do better in Linux. Name me something, anything, it’ll likely be something Linux did long before Windows did and better. Visual effects? Linux has way more in Compiz Fusion, and they look a lot better, AND I can change them, unlike in Windows, the extent of its VFX changes is the window decoration colors and the extent of the visual effects.

    “Linux is old hat and forgotten.”

    Linux is neither. As I said, it’s adoption rate is probably the highest of any operating system out there, and before you start calling Linux old, I have to point out that BOTH families of Windows are even older than Linux. Not that I expect a raving Windows fanboi like yourself to even realize that.

    “No one cares about your playground “standards” and “copyleft” nonsense.”

    Actually, Linux wasn’t built as a proof of concept of “copyleft.” That;s just Richard Stallman and his whiny stallmanists trying to pass Linux off as GNU, which was all abotu politics. Linux is about practicality, which it delivers in spades.

    “We want machines that are fast, fun, and easy to use, and Windows delivers it better than anyone else.”

    Fast? Lord no. Windows is bloated and memory hungry. (7 didn’t really improve much on Vista in this regard. And it certainly still takes way more resources than Linux or BSD.) Compare it to ANY alternative and you’ll find Windows is at least 300% bgger and slower. Windows is not fast.

    Easy to use is too subjective a term. If you were to have grown up on, say, Mac OS, would you still find Windows easy? User friendly is a myth.

    Have you even used Linux or are you just an anti-Linux troll, in which case I should probably just write you off as an asshole?

  • Dwindle Reply

    We could go back and forth like this forever. Every time Linux thinks it’s making progress, it backfires. Remember how Ubuntu was taking over? It failed. See how the Linux netbooks are being returned three times more often than the Windows versions? Failure. 12 years of giving away something for free, only to see it spit out by people who would rather pay $200 for the real thing. Again, Linux is just imitation Windows. It doesn’t matter if KDE looks like Win7, because it doesn’t function like Seven and never will. I’m not saying Linux doesn’t have it’s place in the world and doesn’t have much to offer users, but it is simply a freeware OS that can never compete in the real world.

  • SuperTech Reply

    PC Safeguard doesn’t seem to be in the final release of WIn 7. The menu item was removed and it is not mentioned in the help file.

  • Terry Reply

    Do you guys need an editor who can improve these tips and add even better ones? I’m looking for a paying job.

  • aks Reply

    awesome collection of tips and tricks. thanks for sharing with us.

  • Brian Reply

    Thanks for the list. It is extremely useful for me. No product is perfect but as long as it help you do what you want, its a good piece of software. I found that there is a software call Win7Zilla which does a lot of useful things for Windows 7. I have tried with my Ultimate and tweak it nicely.

  • John Burns Reply

    on your tips and tricks (#3 – Applocker) you mention to go to Computer Navigation -> windows setting, etc….where is “Computer Navigation”

    • Dennis Reply

      Oh, I’m sorry. It’s “Computer Configuration”. It was my mistake. Once again I’m sorry.

      All fixed and the post is edited. Thanks for seeing the typo.

  • Arjun Hunurkar Reply

    i like the the Windows 7, it’s very Reliable. very Designer, and Sporty

  • Aeroxz Reply

    Cool and helpful!!! thx

  • ashish nirkhe Reply

    this is an awesome list of tricks
    i liked it
    thanks a lot

  • ashish nirkhe Reply

    U R GREAT
    AWESOME TRICKS & TIPS :)

  • dsea Reply

    Great tips!

  • Computer Repair in NYC Reply

    Thanks for tips. Some of them can be very useful for me to guide our clients on how to work on Windows 7.

  • SHAIK FAROOQ ALI Reply

    these are very good tricks of windows xp i realy really thankful to u for such a great things so plz grantly request u to send all new things to m,y iod

  • Marco Safe Reply

    Tnx, I was looking for a q lan tips and just found it :)

  • abigal Reply

    any idea how to reduce the time while switching on or off the windows…. as it takes lots of tym to shut down n on it… pliz help

  • Utilidades Reply

    Thank you very much for the support:) Before this, all the articles that appeared recommending the rss icon. In this way everything perfect.

  • Ranolph Reply

    wow this has some epic apps and advice listed – cheers!

  • John Hallquist Reply

    Some Extra Tips:
    - Open Disk Manager and:
    – Stripe Drivers for faster HDD Performance
    – Mirror Drives for Redundancy

    • Dennis Reply

      Thanks for adding those.

  • Aqib Shahzad Reply

    Useful tips shared, helpful for a Windows user like me. Thanks buddy for sharing them.

    • Dennis Reply

      You’re welcome, Aqib. ;)

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